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Raytheon wins $20 million contract for Maritime Strike Tomahawk


According to information published by the U.S. DoD on October 29, 2021, Raytheon Technologies is awarded a $19,595,000 cost-plus-incentive-fee modification (P00016) to a previously awarded contract. This modification adds scope to integrate, produce, qualify, test and field Maritime Strike Tomahawk seeker suites and all subsystems required to provide midcourse and terminal guidance to a modernized tactical Tomahawk missile for the prosecution of maritime targets from surface and subsurface platforms.
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Russian Vyborg Shipyard laid the Purga ice class coastguard ship of project 23550 925 001 Artist rendering of Tomahawk cruise missile (Picture source: Znat-kak)


The procured quantity of seeker suites will be installed in recertified Tomahawk missiles for the Navy. Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona (42%); Boulder, Colorado (21.62%); Dallas, Texas (16.57%); North Logan, Utah (9.24%); Pontiac, Michigan (5.56%); and various locations within the continental U.S. (5.01%), and is expected to be completed in October 2024.

Fiscal 2021 weapons procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $19,595,000 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is a long-range, all-weather, jet-powered, subsonic cruise missile that is primarily used by the United States Navy and Royal Navy in ship- and submarine-based land-attack operations.

Tomahawk cruise missiles are designed to fly at extremely low altitudes at high subsonic speeds, and are piloted over an evasive route by several mission tailored guidance systems. The first operational use was in Operation Desert Storm, 1991, with immense success.

The missile has since been used successfully in several other conflicts. In 1995 the governments of the United States and United Kingdom signed a Foreign Military Sales Agreement for the acquisition of 65 missiles, marking the first sale of Tomahawk to a foreign country.

In 2003, an agreement was approved for the United Kingdom to procure 65 Block IV Torpedo Tube Launch Tomahawks. The United Kingdom began to receive Block IV missile deliveries in January 2008 and successfully declared their In-Service-Date in March 2008.