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US Navy Los Angeles-class submarine USS Key West ready to return at sea


According to a picture released by the U.S. Navy on December 2020, The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Key West (SSN 722) departs Naval Base Point Loma after completing a scheduled maintenance period in the floating dry dock ARCO (ARDM-5).
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Russian Vyborg Shipyard laid the Purga ice class coastguard ship of project 23550 925 001 The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Key West (SSN 722) departs Naval Base Point Loma after completing a scheduled maintenance period in the floating dry dock ARCO (ARDM-5). (Picture source U.S. Navy)


Arco (ARDM-5) is an ARDM-5-class Medium Auxiliary floating drydock for repair and service for the United States Navy. She was placed in service on 23 June 1986 at Naval Base San Diego. She provides dry dock services for the nuclear-powered submarines of Submarine Squadron Eleven in the Pacific, as well as other small craft.

The USS Key West (SSN-722) is a Los Angeles-class nuclear-powered fast attack submarines (SSN) built by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia on 13 August 1981, and her keel was laid down on 6 July 1983. She was launched on 20 July 1985 and commissioned on 12 September 1987.

Los Angeles-class submarines are the backbone of the submarine force of the U.S. Navy, with approximately 40 now in commission. Thirty of those are equipped with 12 Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes for firing Tomahawk cruise missiles. The submarine also carries about 25 torpedo tube-launched weapons, as well as Mark 67 and Mark 60 CAPTOR mines, and were designed to launch Tomahawk cruise missiles, and Harpoon missiles horizontally (from the torpedo tubes). 

The Los Angeles class is powered by the General Electric S6G pressurized water reactor. The submarine has a diesel generator and a bank of batteries to provide electrical power. An emergency propulsion motor on the shaft line or a retractable 325-hp secondary propulsion motor power the submarine off the battery or diesel generator. The submarine can reach a surfaced speed of 20 knots (23 mph; 37 km/h) and 20 knots (23 mph; 37 km/h) in submerged conditions.