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Royal Canadian Navy Halifax-class Frigates Modernization and Life Extension Program
 
The 12 Halifax-class frigates, commissioned between 1992 and 1995, form the backbone of the Royal Canadian Navy. The ships were originally designed to accomplish the Cold War missions of anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare, primarily in the open ocean environment.
The 12 Halifax-class frigates, commissioned between 1992 and 1995, form the backbone of the Royal Canadian Navy. The ships were originally designed to accomplish the Cold War missions of anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare, primarily in the open ocean environment.
 
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Naval Forces News - Canada
 
 
 
Royal Canadian Navy Halifax-class Frigates Modernization and Life Extension Program
 
The 12 Halifax-class frigates, commissioned between 1992 and 1995, form the backbone of the Royal Canadian Navy. The ships were originally designed to accomplish the Cold War missions of anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare, primarily in the open ocean environment.

The Halifax-class Modernization/Frigate Life Extension project manages both the modernization of the combat systems and a planned mid-life ship refit program to ensure the frigates remain effective throughout their service life. This work encompasses modernization of the ships’ platform, including ships’ systems upgrades, acquisition and installation of new capabilities, such as enhanced radar, changes to the platform needed to accommodate the new capabilities, and integration of all aspects of the ships’ operations into an upgraded command and control system.
     
The 12 Halifax-class frigates, commissioned between 1992 and 1995, form the backbone of the Royal Canadian Navy. The ships were originally designed to accomplish the Cold War missions of anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare, primarily in the open ocean environment.
The Canadian navy Halifax-class frigate HMCS Regina (FFH334) is under way off the coast of Hawaii

Picture: US Navy
     
The Halifax-class Modernization/Frigate Life Extension project and other separately-funded projects within the Halifax-class Modernization program are bringing enhanced capabilities to the ships, which are required to meet the new threats and changing operating environments. These include:

Halifax-class Modernization/Frigate Life Extension:
-- A new command and control system;
-- New radar suite;
-- IFF Mode S/5 – Interrogator Friend or Foe Mode S/5;
-- Internal communications system upgrade;
-- Harpoon Missile system upgrade (surface to surface); and
-- Electronic warfare system upgrade;

Other HCM projects:
-- Long-range infrared search and track system (SIRIUS); and
-- Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (surface to air).

Maintenance and sustainment activities and projects will strive to maintain equipment at its current level of capability. These include:
-- Preventive, corrective and unique mid-life maintenance activities;
-- Modifications to the BOFORS 57mm Naval Gun;
-- Replacement of the Shield II Missile Decoy Countermeasures System;
-- Replacement of the Integrated Machinery Control System; and
-- Replacement of the Navigation Radar.

There are also several follow-on, stand-alone contracts let outside the Halifax-class Modernization/Frigate Life Extension project to complete other needed upgrades, such as accommodation for the Cyclone Maritime Helicopter and the new Military Satellite Communication System.

Planning, preparation, and coordination of the modernization began in 2005. Modernization and refits began in September 2010, with HMCS Halifax entering refit on the east coast. HMCS Calgary entered refit on the west coast the following spring, and the remaining ships have been entering refit on an average of every six months since. The first two ships entered testing and trials in the summer of 2012. Each modernization and refit period is expected to take approximately 18 months, with the testing and trials expected to take approximately an additional 18 months.

The final ship upgrade is anticipated to be completed in the 2017 timeframe.

From Canadian Dept. of National Defence