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Republic of Singapore Navy Future Independence Class Littoral Mission Vessels in Details
 
The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) first LMV, RSS Independence, was launched on 3 July 2015 at a ceremony officiated by Minister for Defence Dr Ng Eng Hen. Smarter, faster and sharper - that is the tagline for the new LMVs which will replace the 20-year-old Patrol Vessels (PVs). Designed from the onset to be operated by a leaner crew, the LMV uses technology to its advantage by automating processes with remote systems.
The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) first LMV, RSS Independence, was launched on 3 July 2015 at a ceremony officiated by Minister for Defence Dr Ng Eng Hen. Smarter, faster and sharper - that is the tagline for the new LMVs which will replace the 20-year-old Patrol Vessels (PVs). Designed from the onset to be operated by a leaner crew, the LMV uses technology to its advantage by automating processes with remote systems.
 
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Naval Forces News - Singapore
 
 
 
Republic of Singapore Navy Future Independence Class Littoral Mission Vessels in Details
 
The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) first LMV, RSS Independence, was launched on 3 July 2015 at a ceremony officiated by Minister for Defence Dr Ng Eng Hen. Smarter, faster and sharper - that is the tagline for the new LMVs which will replace the 20-year-old Patrol Vessels (PVs). Designed from the onset to be operated by a leaner crew, the LMV uses technology to its advantage by automating processes with remote systems.
     
The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) first LMV, RSS Independence, was launched on 3 July 2015 at a ceremony officiated by Minister for Defence Dr Ng Eng Hen. Smarter, faster and sharper - that is the tagline for the new LMVs which will replace the 20-year-old Patrol Vessels (PVs). Designed from the onset to be operated by a leaner crew, the LMV uses technology to its advantage by automating processes with remote systems.
Littoral Mission Vessel. Picture: RSN
     
One example - the 80m-long warship's vital signs are monitored remotely by crew with onboard cameras and sensors. The health of its combat and other shipboard systems can be transmitted wirelessly to shore, to facilitate pre-emptive maintenance work.

In the speed department, the LMV manages very respectable speeds in excess of 27 knots (about 50kmh). It can also carry a medium-lift helicopter and Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs) to respond quickly to security incidents. Though larger than the PV, the LMV is highly manoeuvrable and able to endure rougher seas.

On the business end, the LMV carries both lethal and non-lethal options to deal with would-be aggressors. They range from advanced missiles, large and small calibre guns to water cannon systems, and acoustic devices that are capable of projecting verbal warnings over the sea surface.

This new addition to the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)'s fleet is also versatile. It can be easily converted to suit different missions.

For example, it can be fitted with medical modules to support Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief missions, as well as unmanned systems for surveillance or mine-countermeasure operations.

"The first of the new class of LMVs is faster, better equipped, with more capabilities and endurance - these ships will replace the Fearless-class Patrol Vessels… We are proud that today, in Singapore's Golden Jubilee year, we have these new ships to address growing challenges in this region."
- Defence Minister Dr Ng Eng Hen in a Facebook post on 3 Jul, when the first LMV was launched at ST Marine's shipyard located in Benoi.
     
The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) first LMV, RSS Independence, was launched on 3 July 2015 at a ceremony officiated by Minister for Defence Dr Ng Eng Hen. Smarter, faster and sharper - that is the tagline for the new LMVs which will replace the 20-year-old Patrol Vessels (PVs). Designed from the onset to be operated by a leaner crew, the LMV uses technology to its advantage by automating processes with remote systems.
Littoral Mission Vessel. Picture: RSN
     
The names of the RSN's eight LMVs are RSS Independence, RSS Sovereignty, RSS Unity, RSS Justice, RSS Indomitable, RSS Fortitude, RSS Dauntless, and RSS Fearless.

The eight Littoral Mission Vessels (LMVs) will replace the Navy’s Fearless Class Patrol Vessels. The LMVs will be able to carry out maritime security operations and safeguarding of our sea lines of communication more effectively and efficiently. Although larger in size, the LMVs with the innovative design, will be able to operate with a leaner crew size. Adopting the concept of “mission modularity”, these vessels are highly configurable and can embark on a range of mission modules to meet the specific mission needs. The first LMV will be delivered to the Navy in first quarter of 2016.

The LMV sensor suite will include:
Thales NS100 3D Surveillance Radar
Kelvin Hughes Sharpeye Navivation Radar
Stelop Compass D EO Director and 360 degrees all round Surveillance System

The LMV weapon systems will include:
An Oto Melara 76mm main gun
MBDA VL Mica surface to air missiles
Oto Melara 12.7mm Hitrole remote weapon stations
Rafale 25mm Typhoon remote weapon station
     
A unique design feature of the LMVs is the co-location of the ship's vital controls in an Integrated Command Centre. This area in the ship houses the LMV's Bridge, Combat Information Centre, and Machinery Control Room - which are usually housed in separate parts of a warship.
Illustration: RSN
     
Integrated Command Center
A unique design feature of the LMVs is the co-location of the ship's vital controls in an Integrated Command Centre. This area in the ship houses the LMV's Bridge, Combat Information Centre, and Machinery Control Room - which are usually housed in separate parts of a warship.

The LMV also has windows all-round, providing the crew with a 360-degree view of the ship's immediate surroundings - very useful in Singapore's crowded waters, where the LMVs will see most of their service.