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Tuesday, 11 March 2014 16:05
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San Antonio Class (LPD 17) Amphibious Transport Dock
also known as Landing Platform Dock / Amphibious Assault Ship
 
 
 
As the San Antonio-class LPDs have entered service in recent years, Austin-class LPDs have been decommissioned. Collectively, these ships functionally replace over 41 ships providing the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps with modern, seabased platforms that are networked, survivable, and built to operate with 21st century transformational platforms, such as the MV-22 Osprey, the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV), and future means by which Marines are delivered ashore.
 
Description

As the San Antonio-class LPDs have entered service in recent years, Austin-class LPDs have been decommissioned. Collectively, these ships functionally replace over 41 ships (LPD 4, LSD 36, LKA 113, and LST 1179 classes of amphibious ships) providing the Navy and Marine Corps with modern, seabased platforms that are networked, survivable, and built to operate with 21st century transformational platforms, such as the MV-22 Osprey, the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV), and future means by which Marines are delivered ashore.

A contract for final design and construction of San Antonio (LPD 17), the lead ship in the class, was awarded in December 1996; actual construction commenced in August 2000. USS San Antonio was delivered to the Navy in July 2005. LPDs 18-23 have also been delivered to the Navy. New York (LPD 21) is the first of three LPD 17-class ships built in honor of the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The ship?s bow stem was constructed using 7.5 tons of steel salvaged from the World Trade Center.

 
Shiplist
Name
Hull Number
Launched
Commissioned
Homeport
USS San Antonio
LPD-17
07/2003
01/2006
Norfolk
USS New Orleans
LPD-18
12/2004
03/2007
San Diego
USS Mesa Verde
LPD-19
11/2004
12/2007
Norfolk
USS Green Bay
LPD-20
08/2006
01/2009
San Diego
USS New York
LPD-21
12/2007
11/2009
Mayport
USS San Diego
LPD-22
05/2010
05/2012
San Diego
USS Anchorage
LPD-23
02/2011
05/2013
San Diego
USS Arlington
LPD-24
11/2010
02/2013
Norfolk
USS Sommerset
LPD-25
04/2012
03/2014
San Diego
USS John P. Murtha
LPD-26
-
-
-
USS Portland
LPD-27
-
-
-
 
Variants
- HII has a project for an Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense version based on the San Antonio class hull
Technical Data
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Design
The design of the San Antonio Amphibious Assault Ships was jointly developed by U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and industry stakeholders to provide superior performance over a broad range of operational requirements. Construction of the ships continues at Ingalls' shipyards in Pascagoula Mississippi and Avondale Louisiana.
The unique design-engineering approach injected fleet input into the development process before construction began and shaped every element of the ships' systems and spaces to meet future requirements. Each LPD consists of 210 units built utilizing modular construction techniques. Each unit is extensively pre-outfitted with piping, electrical, machinery and ventilation systems along with many pieces of equipment prior to launch.
Features
San Antonio class LPDs are used to transport and land Marines, their equipment and supplies by embarked air cushion (LCAC) or conventional landing craft and Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles (EFV) or Amphibious Assault Vehicles (AAV) augmented by helicopters or vertical take off and landing aircraft (MV 22). These ships support amphibious assault, special operations or expeditionary warfare missions and can serve as secondary aviation platforms for amphibious ready groups.
Capacity:
» 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles
» 2 LCAC landing craft or 1 LCU
» Launch or land two CH53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters.
» Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800.
Missions
The multi-mission LPD 17 class plays a pivotal role in maintaining national security and strengthening the fleet. The ships are modern, networked sea-based platforms that feature improved command and control and enhanced survivability systems combined with tactical lift capability for transporting Marine Expeditionary Units. The Marines and their equipment are landed by embarked landing craft (LCAC) air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff aircraft like the MV-22 Osprey.
Typical Missions include:
» Amphibious assault
» Special Operations
» Expeditionary Warfare
» Humanitarian Relief
Weapons
  • Anti-air missiles:
    2x RIM-116 RAM launchers (21 missiles each)
  • Guns:
    2x MK 46 (Bushmaster II) 30mm guns
    9x MK 26 .50 caliber machine guns
Sensors, Electronics and Decoys
  • Combat Management and Information Systems:
    n/a
  • Optronics:
    n/a
  • Radars and ESM:
    1x AN/SPS-48G 3D air search radar
    1x AN/SPQ-9B surface search & fire control radar
  • Decoys/Counter measures/Jammers:
    AN/SLQ-32 Electronic Warfare Suite
  • Communications:
    Link 11
    Link 16
    Satellite links
Power Generation/Propulsion
Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower.
 
Specifications
Type
Amphibious Transport Dock
Crew
360 Sailors (28 officers, 332 enlisted) and 3 Marines
Operators
United States Navy
Performance
Speed: >22 kts
Range: n/a
Endurance: n/a
Designer/Builder
Ingalls Shipbuilding
Displacement
25,300 tonnes
Aircraft
Up to 4 large helicopters
Dimensions
Length: 208 m
Bream: 32 m
Maximum Draft: 7 m
Detailed View

 
Pictures - Video
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As the San Antonio-class LPDs have entered service in recent years, Austin-class LPDs have been decommissioned. Collectively, these ships functionally replace over 41 ships providing the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps with modern, seabased platforms that are networked, survivable, and built to operate with 21st century transformational platforms, such as the MV-22 Osprey, the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV), and future means by which Marines are delivered ashore.
 
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