U.S. Navy Next Generation Destroyer Zumwalt (DDG 1000) Headed to Sea for Trials

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Naval Forces News - USA
 
 
 
U.S. Navy Next Generation Destroyer Zumwalt (DDG 1000) Headed to Sea for Trials
 
The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) sailed out of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine, yesteday for the very first trials (called builder trials). Zumwalt is the largest destroyer ever built for the U.S Navy. This initial builder sea trials will help check basic systems onboard as well as the seaworthiness of the inverse bow design.
     
The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) sailed out of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine, yesteday for the very first trials (called builder trials). Zumwalt is the largest destroyer ever built for the U.S Navy. This initial builder sea trials will help check basic systems onboard as well as the seaworthiness of the inverse bow design.
The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean Dec. 7, 2015. The multimission ship will provide independent forward presence and deterrence, support special operations forces, and operate as an integral part of joint and combined expeditionary forces. Picture: Twitter/@bzdt3
     
The Zumwalt-class destroyer represents the next-generation of multi-mission surface combatants and will enable access in the open ocean, littoral and ashore. The Navy has procured three Zumwalt-class destroyers.

The ship includes new technologies that deliver capability now and serve as a springboard for incorporation into future ship classes. DDG 1000 is the first U.S. Navy surface combatant to employ an innovative and highly survivable Integrated Power System which will provide power to propulsion, ship's service, and combat system loads from the same gas turbine prime movers. DDG 1000's power allocation flexibility allows for potentially significant energy savings and is well-suited to enable future high energy weapons and sensors.
     
The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) sailed out of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine, yesteday for the very first trials (called builder trials). Zumwalt is the largest destroyer ever built for the U.S Navy. This initial builder sea trials will help check basic systems onboard as well as the seaworthiness of the inverse bow design.
The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean Dec. 7, 2015. The multimission ship will provide independent forward presence and deterrence, support special operations forces, and operate as an integral part of joint and combined expeditionary forces. U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works.
     
As the prime mission systems integrator for the DDG 1000 ship class, Raytheon provides the multi-mission, integrated combat system capability for the program. General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works is the shipbuilder.

The ship features two advanced gun systems firing long-range land attack projectiles that reach up to 63 nautical miles, providing precision, high volume and persistent fire support to forces ashore, along with an approximate five-fold improvement in naval surface fire range. DDG 1000 will employ active and passive sensors and a multi-function radar capable of conducting area air surveillance, including over-land, throughout the extremely difficult and cluttered sea-land interface.

Link to Zumwalt-class destroyer technical datasheet
     
The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) sailed out of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine, yesteday for the very first trials (called builder trials). Zumwalt is the largest destroyer ever built for the U.S Navy. This initial builder sea trials will help check basic systems onboard as well as the seaworthiness of the inverse bow design.
The future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean Dec. 7, 2015. The multimission ship will provide independent forward presence and deterrence, support special operations forces, and operate as an integral part of joint and combined expeditionary forces. U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works.
 

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