12th San Antonio class LPD Order Will Allow HII to Keep Construction Line Open Until LX(R)

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Naval Industry News - USA
 
 
 
12th San Antonio class LPD Order Will Allow HII to Keep Construction Line Open Until LX(R)
 
Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $200 million, cost-plus-fixed-fee advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy for LPD 28, the 12th amphibious transport dock of the San Antonio (LPD 17) class. The funds will be used to purchase long-lead-time material and major equipment, including main engines, diesel generators, deck equipment, shafting, propellers, valves and other long-lead systems.
     
Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $200 million, cost-plus-fixed-fee advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy for LPD 28, the 12th amphibious transport dock of the San Antonio (LPD 17) class. The funds will be used to purchase long-lead-time material and major equipment, including main engines, diesel generators, deck equipment, shafting, propellers, valves and other long-lead systems.
The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock Somerset (LPD 25) sails through the Gulf of Mexico during builder's sea trials. Photo by Steve Blount / Huntington Ingalls Industries.

     
“This funding demonstrates the priority the Navy places on Ingalls getting started on this important ship,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. “Our shipbuilders have made great strides in the LPD program, and we are performing well. Building LPD 28 is key to maintaining a reliable supplier base and leverages our hot production line, enabling our team of shipbuilders to build this ship and future amphibious warships as efficiently and as affordably as possible.”

Ingalls’ 10th San Antonio-class LPD, John P. Murtha (LPD 26), was the most complete and lowest-cost LPD when launched, with many key systems finished months ahead of the shipyard’s historic best in the program.

The San Antonio class is the latest addition to the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.
     
This new San Antonio class order will allow HII to keep the LPD 17 production line going and filling a gap until the future LX(R) amphibious ship program comes online in a few years. LX(R) / LPD Flight IIA rendering here. Image: Huntington Ingalls Industries.
This new San Antonio class order will allow HII to keep the LPD 17 production line going and filling a gap until the future LX(R) amphibious ship program comes online in a few years. LX(R) / LPD Flight IIA rendering here. Image: Huntington Ingalls Industries.

     
LPD 28 is considered a transition vessel between LPD 17 class and the future LX(R): This new San Antonio class order will allow HII to keep the LPD 17 production line going and filling a gap until the future LX(R) amphibious ship program comes online in a few years.

According to HII: LPD Flight IIA is the proven solution for the next generation amphibious transport dock, called "LX(R)" by the U.S. Navy.. Flight IIA is a capable variant of the amphibious transport dock LPD 17. Utilizing the LPD 17's proven hull, Flight IIA is adaptable and can be tailored for specific mission payloads as well as command and decision requirements. LPD Flight IIA is the affordable, capable, adaptable and survivable next generation amphibious ship, a suitable replacement to the Harpers Ferry and Whidbey Island classes of dock landing ships.

Link to San Antonio Class (LPD 17) Amphibious Transport Dock technical datasheet
 

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