This website uses cookies to manage authentication, navigation, and other functions. By using our website, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.

SNA 2016: Kongsberg Showcasing LCS, DDG 51 and LPD 17 Fitted With Naval Strike Missile
 
At the Surface Navy Association's (SNA) National Symposium currently held near Washington DC, Norwegian company Kongsberg is showcasing the Freedom and Independence variant Littoral Combat Ships (LCS), an Arleigh Burke class Destroyer (DDG 51) and a San Antonio class Landing Platform Dock (LPD 17) all fitted with eight Naval Strike Missiles (NSM).
At the Surface Navy Association's (SNA) National Symposium currently held near Washington DC, Norwegian company Kongsberg is showcasing the Freedom and Independence variant Littoral Combat Ships (LCS), an Arleigh Burke class Destroyer (DDG 51) and a San Antonio class Landing Platform Dock (LPD 17) all fitted with eight Naval Strike Missiles (NSM).
 
a
SNA 2016 Show News - Kongsberg NSM
 
 
 
SNA 2016: Kongsberg Showcasing LCS, DDG 51 and LPD 17 Fitted With Naval Strike Missile
 
By Xavier Vavasseur
At the Surface Navy Association's (SNA) National Symposium currently held near Washington DC, Norwegian company Kongsberg is showcasing the Freedom and Independence variant Littoral Combat Ships (LCS), an Arleigh Burke class Destroyer (DDG 51) and a San Antonio class Landing Platform Dock (LPD 17) each fitted with eight Naval Strike Missiles (NSM).
     
Freedom class LCS image with 8x NSM as seen on Kongsberg's booth during SNA 2016.CGI: Freedom class LCS with 8x NSM as seen on Kongsberg's booth during SNA 2016.
     
"Kongsberg is showing what the distributed lethality concept could look like on a number of U.S. Navy vessels" Hans Kongelf, Vice President of Missile Systems at Kongsberg, told us during SNA 2016.

The distributed lethality concept was introduced (and is being advocated) by Vice Admiral Thomas Rowden, the Commander of the U.S. Navy's surface forces. It can be summarized by fitting more weapons on more vessels in order to "deceive the enemy, target the enemy, and destroy the enemy".
     
Independence class LCS image with 8x NSM as seen on Kongsberg's booth during SNA 2016.CGI: Independence class LCS with 8x NSM as seen on Kongsberg's booth during SNA 2016.
     
The Kongsberg booth at SNA 2016 features scale models of the Freedom and Independence variant LCS fitted with "bolt on" NSM launchers. These are the same models unveiled last year at Sea Air Space 2015.

In addition, the booth features large posters showing computer generated images of both LCS as well as never seen before DDG 51 and LPD 17 fitted with NSM launchers.
     
DDG 51 class Destroyer fitted with 8x NSM anti-ship missiles on Kongsberg booth during SNA 2016.CGI: DDG 51 class Destroyer fitted with 8x NSM anti-ship missiles on Kongsberg booth during SNA 2016.
     
On the DDG 51 (Arleigh Burke class) Destroyer, the two launchers (for four NSM each) are fitted amidship between the aft VLS cells and the Phalanx CIWS.

On the LPD 17 (San Antonio class) Landing Platform Dock, the NSM launchers are fitted at the bow, forward of the 40mm gun system and SeaRAM launcher.
     
LPD 17 class amphibious vessel image fitted with 8x NSM as seen on Kongsberg's booth during SNA 2016.CGI: LPD 17 class amphibious vessel fitted with 8x NSM as seen on Kongsberg's booth during SNA 2016.
     
During Sea Air Space last year, Hans Kongelf told us the main strength of the NSM are:
- Defense penetration capabilities thanks to its stealth, extremely low sea-skimming flight profile and high G maneuvers.
- Target recognition: Each NSM is fitted with a library of ship profiles to recognize each ship classes.
- NSM is available today, it is in production, fielded by the Royal Norwegian Navy, the Polish Navy and selected by the Royal Malaysian Navy.

In 2015, Raytheon and Kongsberg announced they formed a teaming agreement for the NSM. The pact represents a second step in the companies' efforts to offer world-class Offensive Anti-Surface Warfare (OASuW) solutions. Raytheon and Kongsberg formed a similar agreement in 2014 to develop the Joint Strike Missile, the air-launched version of the NSM.