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Iconic Section Of HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircraft Carrier Arrives At Rosyth
 
THE HUGE aft island of HMS Queen Elizabeth passed under the Forth Bridge today (Friday June 21) as it made its way to Rosyth, where the ship is being assembled. The iconic section, known as Upper Block 14, was constructed in 90 weeks by Aircraft Carrier Alliance workers at BAE Systems in Scotstoun. The aft island houses HMS Queen Elizabeth’s air traffic control systems and will be the centre of all on-board flight operations.
THE HUGE aft island of HMS Queen Elizabeth passed under the Forth Bridge today (Friday June 21) as it made its way to Rosyth, where the ship is being assembled. The iconic section, known as Upper Block 14, was constructed in 90 weeks by Aircraft Carrier Alliance workers at BAE Systems in Scotstoun. The aft island houses HMS Queen Elizabeth’s air traffic control systems and will be the centre of all on-board flight operations.
 
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Naval Industry News - UK
 
 
 
Iconic Section Of HMS Queen Elizabeth Aircraft Carrier Arrives At Rosyth
 

THE HUGE aft island of HMS Queen Elizabeth passed under the Forth Bridge today (Friday June 21) as it made its way to Rosyth, where the ship is being assembled. The iconic section, known as Upper Block 14, was constructed in 90 weeks by Aircraft Carrier Alliance workers at BAE Systems in Scotstoun. The aft island houses HMS Queen Elizabeth’s air traffic control systems and will be the centre of all on-board flight operations.

     
THE HUGE aft island of HMS Queen Elizabeth passed under the Forth Bridge today (Friday June 21) as it made its way to Rosyth, where the ship is being assembled. The iconic section, known as Upper Block 14, was constructed in 90 weeks by Aircraft Carrier Alliance workers at BAE Systems in Scotstoun. The aft island houses HMS Queen Elizabeth’s air traffic control systems and will be the centre of all on-board flight operations.
(Picture: Aircraft Carrier Alliance)
     
Weighing in at more than 750 tonnes, and standing more than 30 metres tall, the aft island is the final section to make the journey to the Rosyth assembly site.

Aircraft Carrier Alliance Programme Director, Ian Booth, said: “The arrival of the aft island is a massive milestone in the assembly of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Getting to this point has required a fantastic amount of work from thousands of skilled men and women. Seeing this section arrive at Rosyth is a proud moment. Now, before the year is out, we will complete the assembly of HMS Queen Elizabeth, the largest ship in the history of the Royal Navy.”

When the section arrives at Babcock’s Rosyth dockyard it will be positioned at the dock side and final preparations will get underway for the delicate lifting operation that will see it positioned on the flightdeck.

HMS Queen Elizabeth is the first aircraft carrier to use an innovative design of two islands. The forward island, which has already been erected, houses the ship’s bridge. The aft island will house the air traffic control systems.

The aircraft carriers HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales are being delivered by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, a unique partnering relationship between BAE Systems, Thales UK, Babcock and the UK Ministry of Defence.

Forward Island facts and figures

Weight: 753 tonnes
Length: 32 metresBreadth: 14 metres
Height: 31 metres
It contains 1080 pipes; 110 Compartments; 44,000m of cable; 26 windows