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Tuesday, 20 August 2013 08:13
a
Naval Forces News - USA
 
 
 
New coastal command patrol boat with increased capability delivered to US Navy
 
The 65PB1101 coastal command patrol boat (CCB) departed Port Angeles, Wash., to transit to San Diego, Calif., Aug. 5-11. The boat was manned by a Fleet Integration Team consisting entirely of Navy Reservists. The CCB underwent developmental testing in the Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca from April to August 2013. During testing, the boat encountered wave heights of 4-6 feet.
     
The 65PB1101 coastal command patrol boat (CCB) departed Port Angeles, Wash., to transit to San Diego, Calif., Aug. 5-11. The boat was manned by a Fleet Integration Team consisting entirely of Navy Reservists. The CCB underwent developmental testing in the Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca from April to August 2013. During testing, the boat encountered wave heights of 4-6 feet.
A 65PB1101 coastal command patrol boat arrives in San Diego. The patrol boat has increased capability over existing Navy Expeditionary Combat Command craft, including 24-hour mission capability, ergonomic equipment design, both remote and crew-served weapon systems and a robust communications suite. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Donnell Evans/Released)
     
The 65 foot, 50-ton boat was built in Bremerton and Tacoma, Wash., and expands the capabilities of the Navy with its flexibility.

"This boat helps bridge the gap between the large ship navy and the near-coastal assets," said Senior Enlisted Advisor, Master Chief Petty Officer Joe Manning, assigned to Coastal Riverine Group 1 (CRG-1).

The CCB has increased capability amongst existing Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) craft including 24-hour mission capability, ergonomic equipment design, both remote and crew-served weapon systems, and a robust communications suite.
     
The 65PB1101 coastal command patrol boat (CCB) departed Port Angeles, Wash., to transit to San Diego, Calif., Aug. 5-11. The boat was manned by a Fleet Integration Team consisting entirely of Navy Reservists. The CCB underwent developmental testing in the Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca from April to August 2013. During testing, the boat encountered wave heights of 4-6 feet.
The 65PB1101 coastal command patrol boat departs Port Angeles, Wash. to transit to San Diego, Calif. The boat has spent the last four months performing training and trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice William Blees/Released)
     
"The arrival of the Coastal Command Boat marks a critical milestone for the Coastal Riverine Force in which new technologies are expanding our team's ability to support broader missions and battlespace," said Capt. Chris Peterschmidt, commander of CRG-1. "CRG-1 looks forward to leading the way as we man, train, and equip the craft and crew for deployment early next year."

The boat contains a hydraulic crane and shock mitigating seating for 18 crew members. The boat also features sound-deadening curtains which separate the berthing area from the galley and an electronics space and sound-deadening floor mats which isolate the pilothouse, main cabin and galley from machinery and hull-borne noise.
     
The 65PB1101 coastal command patrol boat (CCB) departed Port Angeles, Wash., to transit to San Diego, Calif., Aug. 5-11. The boat was manned by a Fleet Integration Team consisting entirely of Navy Reservists. The CCB underwent developmental testing in the Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca from April to August 2013. During testing, the boat encountered wave heights of 4-6 feet.
A 65PB1101 coastal command patrol boat arrives in San Diego. The patrol boat has increased capability over existing Navy Expeditionary Combat Command craft, including 24-hour mission capability, ergonomic equipment design, both remote and crew-served weapon systems and a robust communications suite. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Donnell Evans/Released)
     
The CCB shares many design philosophies and technologies of the next generation of NECC boats such as the MK-VI Patrol Boat for coastal operations.

CRG-1 is scheduled to take custody of the CCB and the boat will be placed in service in early September 2013.

In conjunction with the arrival of the CCB and other riverine assets during July and August of 2013, CRG-1 has taken significant steps in establishing the first West Coast riverine capability.

The Coastal Riverine Force is a core Navy capability that provides port and harbor security, high value asset protection and maritime security operations in coastal and inland waterways.

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice William Blees, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Northwest
     
The new class of coastal command patrol boats is based on the future US Navy Mark VI patrol boat currently being built by Safe Boats International. 5 MK VI boats have been ordered by the US Navy.
The new class of coastal command patrol boats is based on the future US Navy Mark VI patrol boat currently being built by Safe Boats International. 5 MK VI boats have been ordered by the US Navy.
 
The 65PB1101 coastal command patrol boat (CCB) departed Port Angeles, Wash., to transit to San Diego, Calif., Aug. 5-11. The boat was manned by a Fleet Integration Team consisting entirely of Navy Reservists. The CCB underwent developmental testing in the Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca from April to August 2013. During testing, the boat encountered wave heights of 4-6 feet.
 
------------------------- FLASH NEWS -------------------------
Two Floreal class surveillance frigates belonging to the French Navy Indian Ocean fleet conducted a simultaneous firing exercise with their Exocet anti-ship missiles Two Floreal class surveillance frigates belonging to the French Navy Indian Ocean fleet conducted a simultaneous firing exercise with their Exocet anti-ship missiles.
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